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December 03, 2018

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D

D-offers a spirited and compelling argument for completely rethinking the way we see our universities, and why we need them.

D

B( can never be wholly harnessed to immediate social purposes - particularly in the case of the humanities, which both attract and puzzle many people and are therefore the most difficult subjects to justify.)

D

D

"What Are Universities For? offers a spirited and compelling argument for completely rethinking the way we see our universities, and why we need them."

D

This question is not that hard to answer.
I am more interested in learning the word “harness” also means “to utilise”

D
at the same time there is unprecedented confusion about their purpose and scepticism about their value
compelling argument for completely rethinking the way we see our universities

i think this is D as i think the other options are wrong
can you please explain it
thnks

D
What Are Universities For? offers a spirited and compelling argument for completely rethinking the way we see our universities.

Undoubtedly D!

D
I think the key of passage is : 'In particular we must recognise that attempting to extend human understanding, which is at the heart of disciplined intellectual enquiry, can never be wholly harnessed to immediate social purposes'

D

D

D

A_ not given
B_ can never be wholly harnessed to immediate social purposes --> which means that it is not a compelling idea for why universities
C_ it is not the case for all institutions when each plays a different role
D_ we can draw the message after reading last paragraph

D

D

D

D

D

D

CORRECT ANSWER FROM SIMON:

D

Of course!

D

D

D

Hi Simon,
I have a little question about the first paragraph.

there "is" unprecedented confusion about their purpose and scepticism about their value.

Could we change the "is" to "are"?

Rena,

No, 'confusion' is a singular uncountable noun, so we need to say "there is confusion".

d

I think D is the correct answer

D

D

D

D

D

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